Waterfalls, dense forests and lush green moss dissected by ribbons of perfect loam- there's something special about riding secret trails. Credit: Andy Lloyd

Norway’s haven of hidden singletrack

Hafjell, in Norway, is home to one of the world's best bike parks, but beyond the marked trails is a whole network of singletrack waiting to be discovered

For most of us, the name Hafjell conjures up images of World Cup racing – Stevie Smith winning the overall title, or Josh ‘Ratboy’ Bryceland breaking his ankle in sight of a World Champs gold. But away from the rock-strewn slopes of the race course and the manicured jumps of ‘Rollercoaster’, the small Norwegian ski resort’s got a quieter side. During a trip to the bike park last summer, we were lucky enough to meet up with some locals who showed us a seemingly endless maze of criss-crossing singletrack.

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Our guide Kari Anne shows us the lines, threading it through the boulders. Credit: Andy Lloyd
Our guide Kari Anne shows us the lines, threading it through the boulders. Credit: Andy Lloyd

The mountains around Hafjell aren’t like the Lyngen Alps further north, in that instead of rising to sharp peaks, they level off at roughly 1,000m into a rocky plain that reaches as far as the eye can see. The terrain almost feels like UK moorland, with rocky ribbons of dirt snaking between boulders and bushes. The riding is fast-paced and undulating, punctuated by sharp rises that keep the heart-rate peaking.

When your guide is as fit as Ole Henrik and knows exactly where to out his wheels, there's no time to stop and marvel at the views- just sweat, gasp for air and mash pedals through the rocks. Credit: Andy Lloyd
When your guide is as fit as Ole Henrik and knows exactly where to put his wheels, there’s no time to stop and marvel at the views – just sweat, gasp for air and mash pedals through the rocks. Credit: Andy Lloyd
Sverre and our Ed take a quick break from the lung-busting climbs and bone rattling descents. Credit: Andy Lloyd
Sverre and our Ed take a quick break from the lung-busting climbs and bone-rattling descents. Credit: Andy Lloyd
Riding beside a lake in Norway with a reflection of the sky
In places the trail snaked between big lagoons, and it required some skill to balance on the narrow plank bridges, while batting mosquitos out of our eyes. Credit: Andy Lloyd

In a landscape that unfolds for miles and miles, we could easily have got lost, if it weren’t for our guides, who led us back to civilisation, via an epic descent to the valley floor, known to the locals as ‘Fireplace’. The name, it turns out, has a chilling origin – it comes from a tale of a man who killed his father, cut him into pieces and burnt him in the woods. When the trail builders were breaking ground, they came across the ashes and a charred foot – a discovery that we imagine would have made even the most hardened spade-wielding Norseman jump right out of his plaid shirt!

The vast landscape of rolling rocky tundra humbled us with a feeling of insignificance. Credit: Andy Lloyd
The vast landscape of rolling rocky tundra humbled us with a feeling of insignificance. Credit: Andy Lloyd
Hafjell guide portraits
Good local knowledge is essential to any adventure. Luckily we had locals Ole Henrik, Kari Anne and Sverre on hand. Credit: Andy Lloyd
Waterfalls, dense forests and lush green moss dissected by ribbons of perfect loam- there's something special about riding secret trails. Credit: Andy Lloyd
Waterfalls, dense forests and lush green moss dissected by ribbons of perfect loam – there’s something special about riding secret trails. Credit: Andy Lloyd

We were glad we weren’t riding alone and at night – not just because of the trail’s spooky history, but because in places it threads a fine line along the edge of a rocky river valley. We hung onto the back of Ole Henrik, Kari Anne and Sverre as they showed us the lines. Skittering down loamy chutes and over roots, we finally blasted out onto the highway, grinning from ear to ear.

Eyes up and focus on the trail. Let your concentration wander and the slick roots would make short work of dispatching you into the water. Credit: Andy Lloyd
Eyes up and focus on the trail. Let your concentration wander and the slick roots would make short work of dispatching you into the water. Credit: Andy Lloyd
Sunsets in Norway are something special. Credit: Andy Lloyd
Sunsets in Norway are something special. Credit: Andy Lloyd

We’ll make a confession – we didn’t film much that evening, because we were too busy getting stoked on the trails. But here’s a sample of our GoPro footage to whet your appetite:

The lowdown

If you fancy a bit of the action for yourself, this is what you need to know:

Getting there

Scandinavian Airlines (www.flysas.com) fly regularly to Oslo Gardermoen airport. From there you can hire a car, and Hafjell is two-and-a-half hours away. If you’d rather travel by public transport, catch a train from the airport to the city of Lillehammer, then Hafjell is just a short bus ride.

Facilities

Hafjell is a full-scale ski resort with all the amenities and accommodation options you’d expect. The bike park (www.hafjell.no) has 15 trails, ranging from green-graded beginner runs to black DH lines that incorporate most of the World Cup course. At the base of the mountain is a well-equipped bike shop with a big fleet of Scott rental bikes. Guiding and coaching are available too. The park is open from 16 June to 7 October 2018, but only on weekends, or from Thursday to Sunday in peak season. While you’re there, we’d recommend hiring a car and visiting one of Norway’s other riding spots.

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You can read our full feature on Hafjell in issue 353. Buy that mag and other back issues of MBUK here.